CWL EVENTS ARCHIVE

This page summarises all of the events and activities that Creativeworks London has produced or was involved in. Included are also events and activities that were organised by our collaborators and/or partners.

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This event has passed.
Event:
Critical Wearables Research Lab
Start:
June 29, 2015 9:30 am
End:
June 29, 2015 4:30 pm
Category:
Updated:
May 28, 2015
Venue:
London College of Fashion
Address:
20 John Prince's Street , London, W1G 0BJ , United Kingdom

This event is invite-only – You need an invitation to register for this event. Contact the host to find out more.

What?

There is an urgent need to open up critical thinking and doing around wearable technologies. The headlong rush to market and the huge potential for applications like personal health monitoring occlude both the potential dark side and the possibility for wearables to be part of alternative social formations. In the post-Snowden era we cannot ignore the consequences for privacy, ethics and governance of wearing networked devices. Nor can we ignore the way a narrow focus on individual applications overlooks the potential role of wearables in collective and community-driven activities. By questioning the dominant narratives around wearables and facing up to the dark sides of surveillance and unsustainability, the research lab will help to clear the way for fresh and more unexpected questions about their transformatory potentials.

This research lab will be an intensive one-day event that brings together researchers and practitioners to raise questions and generate new ideas, collaborations and methodologies. It will link directly to a second event which will take the form of a hackathon, prototyping practical devices that draw on questions raised by the research lab.

How?

The lab itself will include ‘material thinking’ – making speculative devices that combine real wearables with junk material which is used to materialise research questions (in the manner of Enquiry Machines1). This hands-on method can make visible the overlooked aspects of existing assemblages and can encourage new questions about what kind of futures are likely or possible. During the day this will be combined with demonstrations of real devices, firestarter presentations, group work and discussions. In the morning we will address head-on the the dystopian aspects of wearables, and in the afternoon we will raise interesting research questions about alternative possible futures. The overall format will be in the unconference or barcamp style.

Who?

Participants will include researchers from a wide range of fields & disciplines, from fashion to machine learning and from computing to cultural studies. It will also appeal to practitioners who are seeking the space to reflect on the meanings being materialised by their current work, and who are looking for new ways to frame future activities. We will draw on the Creativeworks London network of researchers and SMEs, as well as independent research organisations in the arts & humanities, and will reach out to maker communities and other hackers. While the main aim of the research lab is to generate a new set of research questions, the intention is also to curate longer-lasting circuits of interdisciplinary collaboration that drive research initiatives, joint funding bids and potential community and startup activity.

Please note that this event is open to those with serious interest in this subject and as space is limited, people are asked to write a short line signalling their particular interest if they wish to attend. Please click here for information and to contact the host.

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Queen Mary - University of London
Arts & Humanities Research Council
European Union
London Fusion

Creativeworks London is one of four Knowledge Exchange Hubs for the Creative Economy funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) to develop strategic partnerships with creative businesses and cultural organisations, to strengthen and diversify their collaborative research activities and increase the number of arts and humanities researchers actively engaged in research-based knowledge exchange.